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Becca Lipman
Becca Lipman
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Remembering the CrackBerry: BlackBerry Migration Survey

Two-thirds of CIOs believe end user satisfaction is more important than security.




A recent Ponemon Institute survey of 400 IT professionals in financial services found mobility is shifting CIOs to a new model of enterprise IT.

Change in user demographics, risk profiles, security frameworks and user preferences are all drivers of the trends expected to unfold over the next few years.

The study, conducted on behalf of MobileIron, a mobile device management software provider, also zoomed in on the expected changes to BlackBerry usage.

[For more on this topic, see Agility and Preparedness for Change Tops Mobile Strategy Concerns]

Once the crowned jewel of the business executive's arsenal Blackberry's rapid replacement with Android and iPhone highlights the need for agility and "preparedness for change" to maintain an effective mobile strategy.


Two-thirds of CIOs believe end user satisfaction is more important than security.

End-user satisfaction trumps security. While 60 percent of CIOs believe smartphones and tablets are less secure than laptops, less than one-third of respondents say the CIO believes the security of smartphones and tablets is more important than end-user choices and preferences.

This shift in attitude helps explains why Blackberry is falling to the wayside. Users comfortable with using their non-Blackberry devices will request similar formats from the company, or use them in BYOD programs.

[To hear about how financial firms are managing their complex data architectures, attend the Future of the Financial Services Data Center panel at Interop 2014 in Las Vegas, March 31-April 4. You can also REGISTER FOR INTEROP HERE.]


The number of smartphones in financial services firms is expected to double in the next 12 months. During that time, organizations will also see the number of employees accessing business apps other than email increase from 23% to 42%.

• 50 percent of respondents expect that the majority of their employees will be using email and apps on mobile devices in the next 12 months.
• Adoption of BYOD will also grow, with the percentage of personally owned smartphones and tablets in the organization expected to increase from 40 percent to 49 percent in the same time period.

[For more on this topic, see Agility and Preparedness for Change Tops Mobile Strategy Concerns]


44% of devices currently in use at financial services firms are BlackBerry. This is expected to decrease nearly one-third to 30% in the next 12 months.

• 49 percent of those surveyed expect to have zero BlackBerry devices in their organizations 12 months from now.
• 52 percent of respondents have a team in place dedicated to migration from BlackBerry to a multi-OS mobile environment.
• The top three motivations for migration from BlackBerry are employee productivity, employee demands, and availability of applications. Concern about BlackBerry’s financial stability may have increased the urgency of migration, but it is not the primary motivation for most respondents.

[To hear about how financial firms are managing their complex data architectures, attend the Future of the Financial Services Data Center panel at Interop 2014 in Las Vegas, March 31-April 4. You can also REGISTER FOR INTEROP HERE.]


50% of respondents said their company does not have a mobile strategy.

• Strategy gap: 50 percent of respondents say their company does not have a mobile strategy. Of those companies with a mobile strategy, 45 percent say it is not aligned with IT objectives and 36 percent say it is not aligned with business objectives.
• Urgency gap: The line-of-business believes BlackBerry migration is a much higher priority than does IT. On a 10-point scale, 55 percent of respondents rate the level of urgency from the line-of-business as a 9 or 10, while only 15 percent rate the level of urgency from IT as highly.
• Accountability gap: 48 percent say the line-of-business is most responsible for their organization’s mobile strategy, while only 16 percent say that responsibility sits with the CIO. 19 percent believe it is a shared responsibility.

[For more on this topic, see Agility and Preparedness for Change Tops Mobile Strategy Concerns]

 

Becca Lipman is Senior Editor for Wall Street & Technology. She writes in-depth news articles with a focus on big data and compliance in the capital markets. She regularly meets with information technology leaders and innovators and writes about cloud computing, datacenters, ... View Full Bio

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