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4 Takeaways From Caplin's Mobile Trading Study

Don't have a mobile trading offering? Your excuse is invalid.

The latest whitepaper from the trading technology firm Caplin Systems recalls the time when retail banks first added payment and transfer functionalities to mobile apps. Previously, bank apps only gave account balance and recent transaction data, and it was questioned if users would feel comfortable enough to make financial transactions on mobile. The results spoke for themselves; app adoption soared, as did the number of mobile payments customer made.

Retail banks then offered the ability to trade securities on mobile. Again, it was a success, becoming a vital part of trade flow for many banks. The quesiton was then asked, would financial trading by professionals be equally appealing on mobile? Surely professional trading is an activity limited to the desktop?

Once more, the results speak for themselves:

While the appetite and opportunity for mobile trading certainly varies by client segment, our research shows a high proportion of buy-side participants in the markets are just as keen to trade on their mobiles as they are to answer emails on them or pay bills on them. And banks that have aggressively rolled out mobile execution offerings worldwide have seen rapid adoption with few regulatory issues.

The survey further revealed "dramatic gaps between what the buy-side wants and what the sell-side offers." The following chart compares buy-side wants (indicative pricing/research, monitor positions, manage positions, and enter new orders/execute trades) with what the sell-side currently provides.

Becca Lipman is Senior Editor for Wall Street & Technology. She writes in-depth news articles with a focus on big data and compliance in the capital markets. She regularly meets with information technology leaders and innovators and writes about cloud computing, datacenters, ... View Full Bio

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IvySchmerken
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IvySchmerken,
User Rank: Author
10/21/2014 | 2:19:32 PM
Re: Tablets
We may see someone running Value at Risk (VAR) calculations on their Phablet at a trade show.  The trader is  out of the office and the market is volatile. It makes sense to check their portfolio right away.  The calculations are run remotely on a server sitting in a data center in Hong Kong. This is the point of mobility and cloud and all the concepts we write about. But it's also a question of ergonomics and personal preferences.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Author
10/21/2014 | 12:33:04 PM
Re: Tablets
True, smart phones are well on their way to resembling tablets. Soon people won't have to choose between the two! I prefer smaller phones, but I think I'm in the minority there. 

To Ivy's point, I'm not sure whether I can see tablets fully replacing laptops - it depends what the device is being used for. People who need a device solely for financial calculations might lean towards a tablet like the iPad 2, with its faster speed and slim design. However, those who do a lot of typing or require larger screens might prefer a laptop for everyday use. 
Greg MacSweeney
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Greg MacSweeney,
User Rank: Author
10/21/2014 | 7:16:06 AM
Re: Tablets
Also, some of the newer smartphones are approaching the size of a tablet. The iPhone 6 Plus and the Samsung Galaxy are massive....almost the size of an iPad Mini.

But, i hear you. Going from numerous panels on the desktop to a small screen requires some smart reengineering.
IvySchmerken
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IvySchmerken,
User Rank: Author
10/20/2014 | 9:09:10 AM
Re: Tablets
I agree. Tablets are a transition device between laptops and smartphones. I understand that the iPad Air 2 is 18% thinner and 40 percent faster than the previous version, which the New York Times called "a bit of an engineering feat."  Slimmer devices will be easier to carry and faster to use for certain types of apps like those that run calculations for finance. The question is will tablets replace the laptop at some time?
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/19/2014 | 1:19:07 AM
Re: Tablets
Jumping from huge destop display to smaller phone screen might not be comfortable with all. Tablets can be a 'bridge' between these two worlds. 
IvySchmerken
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IvySchmerken,
User Rank: Author
10/17/2014 | 3:26:50 PM
Re: Tablets
Sell-side firms have been providing research on tablets for a few years, but apparently buy side clients want much more, such as indicative pricing, analytics and portfolio holdings. Tablets offer a lot more creative potential to develop apps and more intuitive user interfaces. Tablets also untether traders and sales people from the desk, where they sit in front of four to six screens.
Jonathan_Camhi
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Jonathan_Camhi,
User Rank: Author
10/16/2014 | 2:41:39 PM
Tablets
I would think that tablets, with their increased screen size, would offer a great opportunity to be createive with the suer experience for traders. Tablets are set to replace most desktops over the next few years anyway. So just about every industry is going to have to get on board with that.
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