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Becca Lipman
Becca Lipman
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How Risky Are Your Cloud Service Apps?

See how Box's cloud security risk compares with Dropbox, how Facebook stacks up against Twitter, Office 365 versus Gmail.
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In a recent interview with Rajiv Gupta, CEO and founder of Skyhigh Networks, a cloud visibility and enablement company dedicated to shedding light on cloud security and compliance, it was found CIOs guess their firm is exposed to, on average, 30-42 cloud application. The actual number averages 662. In Financial service, the average is a slightly better 548.

Each application comes with unique risks to the enterprise.

Still, allowing employees to use existing cloud solutions rather than home-grown solutions save IT's time and resources, and gives employee's immediate access to tools that can help solve business problems today.

So what cloud services are enterprise-ready? Find out..

View the full report here.

[To hear about how financial firms managing their complex data architecture, attend the Future of the Financial Services Data Center panel at Interop 2014.]

 

Becca Lipman is Senior Editor for Wall Street & Technology. She writes in-depth news articles with a focus on big data and compliance in the capital markets. She regularly meets with information technology leaders and innovators and writes about cloud computing, datacenters, ... View Full Bio

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Becca L
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Becca L,
User Rank: Author
2/28/2014 | 4:06:17 PM
re: How Risky Are Your Cloud Service Apps?
It's unclear to me what level of responsibility these applications feel to being enterprise ready/secure. Sure, it's good for business and improves reputation, but a lot of these are/were startup services focused on building a brand based on convenience. Security is probably important at the base layer, but to become enterprise ready will take significant work and investment - they have to heavily consider that cost/return.
Greg MacSweeney
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Greg MacSweeney,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/26/2014 | 8:32:53 PM
re: How Risky Are Your Cloud Service Apps?
Sweet. Thanks for the explanation. This should definitely help.
KeithRichmond
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KeithRichmond,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/25/2014 | 4:50:30 PM
re: How Risky Are Your Cloud Service Apps?
Thank you for commenting Greg! Here is what I have been able to find in terms of similarities and differences between Software Defined Networks (SDNs) and Application Defined Networks (ADNs). Software Defined Networks (SDNs) and Application Defined Networks (ADNs) are based on similar concepts but solve separate ends of a complex problem.

Software Defined Networks (SDNs) and Application Defined Networks (ADNs) are the same in the following waysG«™ They both allow customers to dynamically allocate network resources such as bandwidth, diverse routes, and virtual server capacity to attend the needs of the most critical traffic. They also both utilize a Universal Policy Controller (UPC) to provide central administration and allow dynamic configuration of their underlying network infrastructure.

Software Defined Networks (SDNs) and Application Defined Networks (ADNs) are different in the following waysG«™ Software Defined Networks (SDNs) primary focus is inside the data center to allow for greater dynamic allocation of network resources to deal with spikes in resource demands. Software Defined Networks (SDNs) have not addressed the complex task of facilitating secure access to the cloud data centers faced by multi-site enterprises. Application Defined Networks (ADNs) primary focus is virtualizing the edge of the data center creating secure access to the cloud services. Application Defined Networks (ADNs) focus on the millions of brick and mortar enterprise locations need to resolve the core security, performance, and reliability conflicts that are limiting application expansion to data centers. Application Defined Networks (ADNs) allow enterprises to securely reach and consume economic benefits of cloud services, where Software Defined Networks (SDNs) are resident.

After researching both of these technologies, I feel that Application Defined Networks (ADNs) have an advantage over Software Defined Networks (SDNs) simply because Software Defined Networks (SDNs) have not addressed the complex task of facilitating secure access to the cloud or data centers for multi-site enterprises. Most businesses today have multiple locations over a large geographic area and this is exactly what Application Defined Networks (ADNs) are designed to handle.
Guest
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Guest,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/25/2014 | 4:42:05 PM
re: How Risky Are Your Cloud Service Apps?
Thank you for commenting Greg! Here is what I have been able to find in terms of similarities and differences between Software Defined Networks (SDNs) and Application Defined Networks (ADNs).

Software Defined Networks (SDNs) and Application Defined Networks (ADNs) are the same in the following ways. They both allow customers to dynamically allocate network resources such as bandwidth, diverse routes, and virtual server capacity to attend the needs of the most critical traffic. They also both utilize a Universal Policy Controller (UPC) to provide central administration and allow dynamic configuration of their underlying network infrastructure.

Software Defined Networks (SDNs) and Application Defined Networks (ADNs) are different in the following ways. Software Defined Networks (SDNs) primary focus is inside the data center to allow for greater dynamic allocation of network resources to deal with spikes in resource demands. Software Defined Networks (SDNs) have not addressed the complex task of facilitating secure access to the cloud data centers faced by multi-site enterprises. Application Defined Networks (ADNs) primary focus is virtualizing the edge of the data center creating secure access to the cloud services. Application Defined Networks (ADNs) focus on the millions of brick and mortar enterprise locations need to resolve the core security, performance, and reliability conflicts that are limiting application expansion to data centers. They are both based on similar concepts but solve separate ends of a complex problem. Application Defined Networks (ADNs) allow enterprises to securely reach and consume economic benefits of cloud services, where Software Defined Networks (SDNs) are resident.

After researching both of these technologies, I feel that Application Defined Networks (ADNs) have an advantage over Software Defined Networks (SDNs) simply because Software Defined Networks (SDNs) have not addressed the complex task of facilitating secure access to the cloud or data centers for multi-site enterprises. Most businesses today have multiple locations over a large geographic area and this is exactly what Application Defined Networks (ADNs) are designed to handle.
IvySchmerken
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IvySchmerken,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2014 | 4:37:14 PM
re: How Risky Are Your Cloud Service Apps?
It's interesting how only one file of the top ten file sharing service - Box - is considered enterprise ready in terms of security. Even Google Drive is in the medium risk category.
Greg MacSweeney
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Greg MacSweeney,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/25/2014 | 2:27:00 PM
re: How Risky Are Your Cloud Service Apps?
Yes, ADNs are not really understood at this time by most users. SDNs (software defined networks) are another option that people are still looking at. But many ask, are SDNs and ADNs the same thing? Or do I need them both?
Keith Richmond
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Keith Richmond,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/24/2014 | 3:51:01 PM
re: How Risky Are Your Cloud Service Apps?
Becca,
Great article! Security is so critical today because a single breach can ultimately cost a business big time. The repercussions of a single breach can heavily impact a companyG«÷s revenue and the publicG«÷s perception of a company. While some companies are large enough to absorb this impact, most are not and the effects can be felt for many years after the breach occurs. Cloud utilization is a business trend that will continue to grow extremely fast in the foreseeable future and my hope is that the businesses who use cloud technology will implement an enablement solution that can handle the ever-changing security threats that are out there.

For businesses that have many locations over a large geographic area there is no doubt that cloud technology is the perfect solution. However, not all cloud enablement solutions are created equal when it comes to security. Most retailers, restaurants, and gas stations currently utilize or would like to utilize the cloud to access their applications. Applications can pretty much be defined as anything a business needs to process in order to conduct business. Payment, loyalty, tank monitoring, and point-of-sale (POS) support are just some examples of applications. The information transmitted with these applications contains sensitive customer and business information so making sure it is secure is absolutely critical!

Based on what I have been able to find, it appears that a relatively new technology called Application Defined Network (ADN) is starting to make its presence known in the cloud enablement world because of everything it is capable of, including security. An Application Defined Network (ADN) is specifically designed to handle businesses with multiple locations that operate multiple applications as it allows security features such as firewalls, intrusion detection, content filtering, encryption, multi-factor authentication and logging to be customized on a per application basis. If an Application Defined Network (ADN) is breached by an outside party, the ability of the breach to bleed between applications is virtually eliminated due to each application having customized security and performance policies.

In my research about the Application Defined Network (ADN) technology, I came across what appears to be the leading solution to enable it, a product called Cybera ONE. Based on what the companyG«÷s website states, Cybera ONE is a single appliance that is installed at the business / store location that has the ability to enable multiple applications over broadband through separate, compartmentalized virtual networks on a single network platform. It allows applications to be added in the future which means it has the ability to grow as the business grows, eliminating expensive equipment upgrade costs. It also appears to be very simple to install as it can be installed by on-site personnel, eliminating the need to hire expensive IT technicians.

I think businesses that utilize Application Defined Networks (ADNs) will be the leaders and set the example in security compliance in the coming years and I am looking forward to seeing it take off.

I have only been able to find a few articles about the Application Defined Network (ADN) technology which is surprising seeing how interesting it is. This may be something you want to look at for future article ideas. Thank you for writing such an interesting article and providing details on the G«£Cloud Adoption & Risk ReportG«•.
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