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Jonathan Camhi
Jonathan Camhi
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Gartner: 75% of Mobile Apps Will Fail Security Tests Through 2015

The rise of BYOD means enterprises must implement security testing and containment solutions, according to new Gartner research.

Mobile applications are a major security vulnerability for those enterprises that are implementing BYOD policies, according to new research released by Gartner. The analyst firm forecasts that 75% of mobile applications will fail basic security tests through 2015 and could offer an entry point for hackers looking to breach an enterprise’s network.

Gartner also forecasts that the focus of breaches will move from desktops and laptops to smartphones and tablets by 2017, as mobile devices continue to replace PCs. Current security features of mobile devices and applications will not be able to stop those breaches, and enterprises need to implement containment methods such as application wrapping or hardening to protect themselves, according to the report.

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The good news from the research is that providers of application security testing will modify their offerings to test mobile applications, Gartner predicts. Static and dynamic application security testing technologies are commonly used by enterprises, but mobile application testing is a new space for these technologies that will need to be adjusted to meet the security challenges around mobile apps, the report says.

Enterprises rarely perform security testing on mobile applications today, Dionisio Zumerle, principal research analyst at Gartner, said in a statement regarding the research: “Most enterprises are inexperienced in mobile application security. Even when application security testing is undertaken, it is often done casually by developers who are more concerned with the functionality of applications, not their security.”

[Read the rest on Bank Systems & Tech]

Jonathan Camhi has been an associate editor with Bank Systems & Technology since 2012. He previously worked as a freelance journalist in New York City covering politics, health and immigration, and has a master's degree from the City University of New York's Graduate School ... View Full Bio
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Jonathan_Camhi
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Jonathan_Camhi,
User Rank: Author
9/22/2014 | 11:24:51 AM
Re: Limited Apps lead to security risk
No this is talking about apps that aren't specific to financial services professionals. Think about all of the apps though that people download from app stores that they could be using for business puproses: calendar apps, apps for taking notes and reminders and even social media apps. You can't really get the full value of a mobile workforce without enabling some of those kinds of apps. But IT has little control over the security of those apps. The suggestion in the research around containing any vulnerabilities there though is a good one.
IvySchmerken
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IvySchmerken,
User Rank: Author
9/22/2014 | 11:11:55 AM
Limited Apps lead to security risk
That's interesting! Then it might be better for IT departments to provide more robust functionality in their mobile apps so that users are less tempted to use insecure apps. This way, financial services cos. can control the security.  But what types of apps are we referring to? Surely, the business apps specific to banking and capital markets professionals are not available on the apps store?
Jonathan_Camhi
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Jonathan_Camhi,
User Rank: Author
9/19/2014 | 9:50:13 AM
Re: Confused by 75% failure rate
The research refers to apps that are available in app stores, not ones developed by IT departments. The problem there is that the apps developed by IT departments often skirt the security problem by limiting functionality, which can be frustrating for end users who then turn to the app stores for an alternative.
IvySchmerken
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IvySchmerken,
User Rank: Author
9/19/2014 | 8:28:44 AM
Confused by 75% failure rate
Jonathan, the 75% failure rate is staggering. Does this mean there's a 75% failure rate for mobile apps that are already installed on mobile devices brought to work (BYOD)? Or, does this failure rate apply to enterprise apps that companies are allowing employees to install on BYOD? I find it hard to believe that mobile apps developed by IT departments/business units are failing mobile security tests at such a rate rate.
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