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Michael Lewis' "The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine"

First Lewis writes "Liar's Poker" about the excessive culture he witnessed while he was at Solomon Brothers, and now he follows it up with "The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine," a scathing critique of Wall Street and its actions before, during and after the credit crisis.

If you ranked the people who are the most disliked by Wall Street executives, Michael Lewis is probably at the top of the list (along New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo and probably U.S. Congressman Barney Frank). First Lewis writes "Liar's Poker" about the excessive culture he witnessed while he was at Solomon Brothers, and now he follows it up with "The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine," a scathing critique of Wall Street and its actions before, during and after the credit crisis. Here is Lewis' "60 Minutes" interview from Sunday's episode, in two parts:

Inside the Collapse, Part I:
Watch CBS News Videos Online

For Part II, click below:Inside the Collapse, Part II:
Watch CBS News Videos OnlineFirst Lewis writes "Liar's Poker" about the excessive culture he witnessed while he was at Solomon Brothers, and now he follows it up with "The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine," a scathing critique of Wall Street and its actions before, during and after the credit crisis. Greg MacSweeney is editorial director of InformationWeek Financial Services, whose brands include Wall Street & Technology, Bank Systems & Technology, Advanced Trading, and Insurance & Technology. View Full Bio

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