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Fidelity CIO Walks In His Father's Footsteps

Fidelity Institutional CIO Ron DePoalo began learning about Wall Street IT from his father at an early age. Now he is drawing on those lessons to to drive tech innovation and business alignment.

Unlike most technologists, Ron DePoalo literally grew up on Wall Street. His father, who was the head of technology for Salomon Brothers, used to bring Ron to his office on Wall Street when Ron was a young boy, fostering a life-long love of the financial industry in his son.

Today, after two decades at Merrill Lynch and four years at Fidelity, DePoalo has risen through the ranks to his current position of CIO of Fidelity Institutional, where he leads 2,500 technologists across departments ranging from institutional wealth management services to the capital markets group -- which is made up of fixed income, prime brokerage and equity divisions -- as well as a family office group serving ultrahigh-net-worth individuals.

"My father did a lot of influencing and mentoring of me," he says. "Not just as a dad, but also as a professional, an IT professional and a senior executive."

Read the rest of Melanie Rodier's profile from Wall Street & Technology's 2012 Gold Book. Melanie Rodier has worked as a print and broadcast journalist for over 10 years, covering business and finance, general news, and film trade news. Prior to joining Wall Street & Technology in April 2007, Melanie lived in Paris, where she worked for the International Herald ... View Full Bio

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